Fraser Falls Rain Garden (2012)
Delta Nature Reserve underneath Alex Fraser Bridge Approach, North Delta

Burnsview Secondary students take on SFPR mitigation projects Phase 1

Students of Danick Benoit’s Environmental Science class at Burnsview Secondary School in North Delta suggested the creation of a park on the Fraser River shoreline, just east of the Alex Fraser Bridge, as an environmental mitigation measure for the South Fraser Perimeter Road. The site they had in mind ...

read more

 

Fraser Falls Rain Garden

Fraser Falls Rain Garden

Fraser Falls Rain Garden

images/Raingarden/16_FraserFalls_Slide75.JPG

images/Raingarden/16_FraserFalls_Slide76.JPG

images/Raingarden/16_FraserFalls_Slide77.JPG

images/Raingarden/16_FraserFalls_Slide78.JPG

images/Raingarden/16_FraserFalls_Slide79.JPG

images/Raingarden/16_FraserFalls_Slide80.JPG

 

Burnsview Secondary students take on SFPR mitigation projects Phase 1

Students of Danick Benoit’s Environmental Science class at Burnsview Secondary School in North Delta suggested the creation of a park on the Fraser River shoreline, just east of the Alex Fraser Bridge, as an environmental mitigation measure for the South Fraser Perimeter Road. The site they had in mind had in fact already been earmarked for just such a park, the St. Mungo Recognifition Site (honouring First Nations and fisheries history).

So instead, the students took on a 2-phase rain garden project, financed by SFPR and with technical assistance from Cougar Creek Streamkeepers.
Phase I was dubbed “Fraser Falls” Rain Garden by the students, because this garden uses rainwater runoff that plummets down from open pipes on the underside of the Alex Fraser Bridge Approach high above. From 1986 when the bridge was built, until 2012 when the rain garden was planted, the only vegetation benefitting from this water were blackberries, reed canary grass and a few tansies. Now, hundreds of native plants -- including trees, shrubs, ferns, groundcovers and sedges -- are growing vigourously underneath the south end of the bridge.

Fraser Falls Rain Garden filters contaminants from bridge deck runoff, and also provides much-needed riparian vegetation for adjacent Cougar Creek as it flows through this industrialized area and out to the Fraser River. The garden also serves to welcome walkers and cyclists to a superb trail system that connects the Fraser River to Boundary Bay, passing many environmental treasures along the way.

Read about Phase II of the Burnsview students’ mitigation efforts under Tidewaters Rain Garden.

Home / Contact us / Site Map